Due Dates and Semester Ending Information

by bhemenwa

Macroeconomics 01, MWF 9:00am:

Fiscal Policy assign; Due Friday, Nov. 30

Banking assign; Due Wednesday, Dec. 5**

Monday, Dec. 3 – NO CLASS –

Semester Paper; Friday, Nov. 30

TEST #3; Friday, Dec. 7

 

Macroeconomics 02, TTh 9:30am:

Fiscal Policy assign; Due Thursday, Nov. 29

Banking assign; Due Tuesday, Dec. 4**

Semester Paper; Friday, Nov. 30

TEST #3; Thursday, Dec. 6

 

Macroeconomics 03, TTh 12:30pm:

Fiscal Policy assign; Due Thursday, Nov. 29

Banking assign; Due Tuesday, Dec. 4**

Semester Paper; Friday, Nov. 30

TEST #3; Thursday, Dec. 6

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Microeconomics 01, MWF 11:00am:

Externalities assign; Due Friday, Nov. 30**

MRP assign; Due Friday, Nov. 30**

Monday, Dec. 3 – NO CLASS –

            Semester Paper; Friday, Nov. 30

TEST #3; Wednesday, Dec. 5

            Final Exam Distribution; Friday, Dec. 7

** I’d recommend that you try turning in these last assignments early.  I will pass back any early submissions during the class period prior to Test #3.

 

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We are just two weeks away from Finals week!  Above I have posted all the remaining assignments and relevant dates leading to the Final Exam.  You can find your scheduled Final Exam period and the Review Guide at the top of the Lecture Notes page.  I will have the remainder of the referenced articles posted by Tuesday.

It is incredibly important that you don’t start the Holiday Break before the Semester ends!!  Despite being on the final stretch, you still have roughly 45% of your course grade outstanding as of right now!!  Below are instructions on how to estimate your course grade as of right now:

You will need to find the Percentages for each component graded so far.  The percentage of the points earned for TEST #1 and the Midterm are provided for you in the grading rubric.  To find your percentage for homework add up the points earned and divide by the total points possible.  You will also need to estimate a participation grade, remember that both punctual attendance and regular participation are needed to earn full credit.  If you have any absences/tardies, or have not regularly been active in class discussions you will not earn full credit.

Take your Test #1 percentage and multiply by .20

Take your Midterm percentage and multiply by .30

Take your Homework percentage and multiply by .40

Take your estimated Participation percentage and multiply by .10

Adding together these four numbers will give you a rough estimate of your current course standing.  The course will be graded on a standard 10 point grading scale (outlined in the syllabus).  With Test #3, the Semester Paper and the Final Exam still left, you have the ability to impact this estimate by about +/-20% overall.

Test #3 grades and Semester Paper grades will be available during Final Exam week.  I will pass them back during your scheduled exam, or you may stop by my office prior to that to receive them.  Lastly, don’t forget that you MUST turn in a BlueBook to me before your scheduled Final Exam time.  This is what you will take the exam in; I will not allow you to take the exam if I have not received it in advance.

If you have any questions, please stop by and ask.

Due Date

by bhemenwa

Microeconomics 01, MWF 11:00am:

Durable Goods; Due Wednesday, Nov. 21

Aside from Pumpkin pie, this is what I will be thankful for this Thanksgiving...

by bhemenwa

I have officially sent out the last of the Rough Draft comments, I replied to the original email you used to submit them (for those who didn’t use your Richland email).  If you have not received yours back please let me know ASAP.

A few points of emphasis for everyone, especially those who did not submit a rough draft:

Remember that the focus of the paper is to explain Economics.  The economic concepts you identify are the main characters in your paper.  After the introductory paragraph everything should directed at giving a detailed explanation on how your topic is precisely using economics.  You don’t want either to stand alone; no sentences should be just economics and none should be just about your topic. 

I read a LOT of papers on the iPhone 5.  Most were okay, some stood out as being really well done.  I would recommend if you did not submit a draft to pick something different.  If you did submit a draft on the iPhone 5 make sure to give the paper the attention it needs, I will not directly grade you against each other but I am now VERY WELL INFORMED about the research and information accessible.  I will very easily see where you cut corners in your research.

Hurricane Sandy and Price Gouging

by bhemenwa

Given the devastation and consequential shortages of resources following Hurricane Sandy, discussions of Price Gouging have emerged.  Here are a few articles that were pretty interesting debating the laws/policies implemented to ration items and not allow market prices (in other words, Price Gouging Laws).  The first three links are a small back-n-forth between journalists, both raising some unique perspectives.  The last two links raise interesting issues.

                How to Fix the Gas Shortage: Let ‘em Gouge

                Hurricane Sandy’s Lessons on Preserving Capitalism

                Would the Rich Corner the Market Without Gouging Laws?

                Is Price Gouging Reverse Looting?

                Post-Sandy Price Gouging: Economically Sound, Ethically Dubious

I’m not saying I agree with this, but some of the things I considered when reading these were:

Couldn’t inflated prices post-Sandy essentially be considered a tax on not preparing (prices before the storm were at lower levels), so to some extent is this a consequence of gambling by residents?

If wealthier people shouldn’t be allowed to use their resources to support their standard of living, what incentive is there for the behaviors that lead to economic growth?

In-Class Activity

by bhemenwa

Macroeconomic Students:

I’ve posted the article “College Covered,” in the articles column of the current section; please read for next week classes.  At some point, we will be doing an in-class activity breaking into groups and developing Growth Policy type programs.  The “College Covered” article provides a very good example of how these programs work (it is not officially a government policy but it works like one).  Groups will be designated with developing programs for local implementation that solve issues in education levels, spending, job creation, wealth and crime.  Ultimately you will, as a group, informally present your ideas to the class.  It may also be helpful to do a little bit of extra research on the Kalamazoo Promise.  You must be present to participate and this will count as a homework assignment grade.

Microeconomic Students:

We finish the semester with a similar activity, it may be helpful to start thinking about it now.

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