Chapters 7 - 8: Study Guide


  1. Determine the probabilities associated with the standard normal distribution. Shade the proper region under the curve. Six parts. Look at problems 7.6 - 7.39.
  2. Find a z-value when the area under the curve is known. Look at problems 7.46 - 7.48.
  3. Multiple Choice. Know the properties of the Standard Normal distribution.
  4. Multiple Choice. Know the properties of the Student's t distribution.
  5. Multiple Choice. Know the properties of the sampling distribution of the sample mean (Central Limit Theorem).
  6. Multiple Choice. Know the properties of a good estimator.
  7. Definitions. Supply the term being defined. Four parts. Know the definitions of: (7) Sampling error, Standard error of the mean, z value; (8) Confidence interval, Degrees of Freedom, Estimator, Interval estimate, Maximum error of the estimate, Point estimate.
  8. Apply the normal distribution to solve an application problem. Look at problems 7.54 - 7.66*.
  9. Find the probability involving the sample mean and Central Limit Theorem. Look at problems 7.100 - 7.117*.
  10. Find the cutoff scores for an exam so that a certain percent of the class receives a specific letter grade. Look at problem 7.92.
  11. Approximate the binomial probability using the Normal distribution. Also give the actual value using the binomial program on the calculator. Look at problems 7.130 - 7.139*.
  12. Find a confidence interval for the mean. Look at problems 8.10 - 8.16*.
  13. Estimate the sample size necessary to construct a confidence interval for the mean. Look at problems 8.20 - 8.25*.
  14. Construct a confidence interval for the mean when the sample size is small. Look at problem 8.46*.
  15. Construct a confidence interval for the population proportion. Look at problems 8.49 - 8.59*.
  16. Estimate the sample size necessary to construct a confidence interval for a population proportion. Look at problems 8.60 - 8.64*.


This is a group exam. The first page (problems 1 - 7) must be worked individually and turned in. The remainder of the test may then be worked with a partner. There is no requirement that you work with anyone else.


Last updated: Sunday, June 30, 1996 at 9:13 PM
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