Math 160 - Projects




Listed below are the various projects that will be required throughout the semester. Each of these are worth 20 points and will be due the day following the exam for the appropriate chapter. These projects take you above and beyond the material covered in the book or require outside data acquisition. You may work in groups of up to three people per project. Turn in one project with all group member's names on it. Plan on reading the section of the book dealing with the matter before we cover it in class; you will not always have time to finish the project if you wait until we do.

Project 1, Chapter 3

Your project is to plan a retirement fund for yourself. To simplify calculations, assume all transactions - starting of annuity fund, retirement, and death - occur on your birthday. Assume a nominal interest rate of 6% has been guaranteed for the remainder of your life.

Project 2, Chapter 4

Part I (10 points)

Part II (10 points)

Savvis Communications has been ranked as having the best Internet backbone. The details of Savvis' plan and a map of their network backbone can be found off their homepage at http://www.savvis.com.

For those that are interested, additional information on Savvis and the national backbone of other Internet Service Providers can be found at Boardwatch Magazine: http://www.boardwatch.com/ISP/backbone.html

Project 3, Chapter 6

John and Mitchy run a computer store. They can purchase 10 computers from Zol and Denny for $2000 each, 30 computers from McGuinn and McGuire for $1800 each, or 50 computers from Sebastian for $1700 each (they can buy from more than one dealer, but only one order per dealer). John and Mitchy sell the computers for $2100 each. Each computer that is left at the end of the month will be sold in a clearance sale for $1300. John and Mitchy estimate a loss of goodwill of $100 for each customer which comes into the store, but is unable to purchase a computer. During the month, the customers will either demand 15, 30, 45, or 60 computers. Assume the probability of 15, 30, 45, or 60 computers is 0.10, 0.15, 0.50, and 0.25 respectively.

Project 4, Chapter 8

Project 5, Chapter 9